Wednesday, July 22, 2020

11 Tips on How to Do Well in Law School

Artwork by Jeremiah Joenard Olivas Gallo


“Working really hard is what successful people do…”

-Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success


Law school is not a joke. It is not a hobby. It is serious business; very very serious business.


As a faculty member and assistant dean of De La Salle College of Law, I used to join the panel who screened law school applicants. We often asked why they want to study law because this is how we assess if they have the right motivation to go through such rigorous training.


I remember an applicant who said that she was a high school principal, her children were all grown up and there was nothing much to do at night, so she decided to attend law school. Her facial expression and manners revealed that she was simply looking for a hobby to occupy her spare time. I thought she did not have the right motivation and felt she would not last two weeks. True enough, after two weeks, she dropped out.

Thursday, April 30, 2020

To the 2019 Bar Passers: Welcome to the profession


Imagine that in a room of 10 persons, only 2 would qualify. Or out of 100, only 27 would make it.

It's that tough an exam. Only 27.36%  passed the 2019 bar exams, and the results were released by the Supreme Court yesterday, April 29. (My classmate Mina Francisco reminded me that during our time, the 1987 bar, it was just 17%). A long journey of at least 20 years --- counting four in college, four in law school, six in elementary and now six in high school, not to mention six months studying for the bar exams. 

Sunday, April 19, 2020

Make the child really yours: How to correct simulated birth






Photo: pexels.com


Zara and Zaldy have been married for 10 years. They long for a child, and consulted many doctors. Despite work-ups, they have not been successful. Their cousin Lala, a single mom with three children, got pregnant by her current boyfriend. After giving birth to a baby boy, she worked immediately. As a result, she had to leave the child to the care of her neighbor.

When Zara and Zaldy got wind of this, they decided to visit the baby often. Observing how neglected the child had become, they talked to Lala who agreed that they can take the child and raise him as their own.