Saturday, October 10, 2020

Live, Jesus, in our hearts. Forever.

Photo by Ike Louie Natividad from pexels.com



I used to have a strict quiet time rule for myself, feeling that my quiet time was complete when I read X chapters of the Bible each day. I followed a four-chapter-a-day plan and found myself more focused on finishing the chapters than meditating on the Word. As long as I ticked the boxes on the reading plan, I thought it was okay. It was like following a walking-for-health plan, in which I had to log 10,000 steps on my pedometer and that was it.

But is that what quiet time really is? Is that what spiritual formation is - the goal of becoming more like Jesus Christ?

I do not see Jesus bringing out a checklist of scriptures to read each day, and then going about this routine as if He had finished his spiritual formation goal for the day.

I read the Book of John this month to observe how Jesus dealt with people, how he lived. If I am a Christ-follower, then I must know his lifestyle. Thinking of the Book of John, the other gospels and the New Testament in general, I never read any verse that required a quiet time of 30 minutes or one hour daily.

I have read about Jesus spending a lot of time in prayer, about the disciples examining the scriptures to see if the preachers are accurately citing it. 

I have read about Jesus asking the disciples if they can watch and pray for at least one hour instead of sleeping. I have read about Jesus singing hymns and talking to the people about salvation. In my recent study of the gospel of John, Jesus talked about salvation in almost every chapter.

Jesus prayed for the sick. He wept when Lazarus died even when he knew he was going to raise him from the dead. He got angry when businessmen did not give due respect to his Father's house.

He attended a wedding. He talked to an outcast woman. He healed persons with disabilities, one who could not walk and another who could not see. He fed thousands. He did something to ease suffering. He reasoned out so those religious leaders would not condemn a man who could not walk since birth. He saved a prostitute from being stoned to death. 

This is my Jesus. It takes more than ticking off a checklist of verses to be more like him. 

In La Salle College of Law, where I have been teaching for a decade, there is this one-line prayer that stays with me - "Live, Jesus, in our hearts. Forever." 

To be more like him is to let him reign  in our hearts.

Have a great day, my friends!








Wednesday, July 22, 2020

11 Tips on How to Do Well in Law School

Artwork by Jeremiah Joenard Olivas Gallo


“Working really hard is what successful people do…”

-Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success


Law school is not a joke. It is not a hobby. It is serious business; very very serious business.


As a faculty member and assistant dean of De La Salle College of Law, I used to join the panel who screened law school applicants. We often asked why they want to study law because this is how we assess if they have the right motivation to go through such rigorous training.


I remember an applicant who said that she was a high school principal, her children were all grown up and there was nothing much to do at night, so she decided to attend law school. Her facial expression and manners revealed that she was simply looking for a hobby to occupy her spare time. I thought she did not have the right motivation and felt she would not last two weeks. True enough, after two weeks, she dropped out.

Thursday, April 30, 2020

To the 2019 Bar Passers: Welcome to the profession


Imagine that in a room of 10 persons, only 2 would qualify. Or out of 100, only 27 would make it.

It's that tough an exam. Only 27.36%  passed the 2019 bar exams, and the results were released by the Supreme Court yesterday, April 29. (My classmate Mina Francisco reminded me that during our time, the 1987 bar, it was just 17%). A long journey of at least 20 years --- counting four in college, four in law school, six in elementary and now six in high school, not to mention six months studying for the bar exams. 

Sunday, April 19, 2020

Make the child really yours: How to correct simulated birth






Photo: pexels.com


Zara and Zaldy have been married for 10 years. They long for a child, and consulted many doctors. Despite work-ups, they have not been successful. Their cousin Lala, a single mom with three children, got pregnant by her current boyfriend. After giving birth to a baby boy, she worked immediately. As a result, she had to leave the child to the care of her neighbor.

When Zara and Zaldy got wind of this, they decided to visit the baby often. Observing how neglected the child had become, they talked to Lala who agreed that they can take the child and raise him as their own.

Friday, March 30, 2018

How can you correct clerical errors in your birth certificate?


Photo by Rene Asmussen on pexels.com


If there are wrong entries in your birth certificate, such as a misspelled first name, birthday or birthplace, there are legal steps to correct these.

Some people have tried to correct their birth certificate by hand, believing that it's the right thing to do, but that is certainly not the way. That would be tampering with an official document, which is punishable by law, even if done with good intention.